Tuesday, June 13, 2017

Cranberry Orange Nut Bread


I like to make sweet nut breads because they can be used as a breakfast item, a lunch snack or an easy dessert after dinner. I make several sweet breads for this purpose. If I have ripe bananas, it's Banana Nut Bread. I also make a Cranberry Pineapple Nut Bread.  But my favourite is Cranberry Orange Nut Bread. Here's the recipe I used from allrecipes.com.

Cranberry Orange Nut Bread

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 3/4 cup white sugar
  • 3/4 teaspoon salt
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1 cup chopped cranberries
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts or pecans
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil
  • 3/4 cup orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon orange zest

If you use dried cranberries, put one cup in a little water and bring them to a boil. Remove from heat and let them reconstitute while you prepare the other ingredients.

Mix together the egg, oil, orange juice, and orange zest. Combine the flour, sugar, salt, baking powder, and baking soda. Pour the egg mixture into the flour mixture, and stir until just blended. Mix in cranberries and nuts (I prefer pecans).

Grease a 9x5 inch loaf pan (or two smaller ones) and sp
oon in the batter. Bake for 50 minutes at 350 degrees. Cool for 10 minutes, then remove from the pan(s) and cool completely.

I like to use the small pans because the bread cuts just the right size to make little sandwiches filled with pineapple cream cheese spread for lunch.

Hop on over to the Not So Modern Housewife and see some great ideas for homesteading and simple living.

http://nancyonthehomefront.com/Want more ideas? Try Nancy's Our Simple Homestead Blog Hop.

Friday, June 9, 2017

3 FREE Kindle e-Books from June 24-28


As a special thank you to all of our blog readers, here are three Kindle e-Books just for you.

Pick one or all, they're FREE
from June 24-28 

and you don't have to own a Kindle to enjoy them. Just get a free Kindle app for your smartphone, pad or computer.

Check here if you need a free Kindle App.



Flying the Pacific Northwest 

Description: Airports of Western Washington and Oregon form the backdrop for adventures in the Pacific Northwest. Take the controls of a Piper Arrow, as your personal flight instructor leads you to out-of-the-way spots. For armchair pilots and experienced pros, this book is an escape so realistic you’ll swear you’re airborne.

Click here for your FREE copy of Flying the Pacific Northwest.



Up the Inlet

Description: Come boating up the inlets of coastal British Columbia, where the mountains drop into the sea, and lifestyles focus on self-assurance and a different sense of purpose. Follow along as we cruise northward from the Strait of Georgia, to Cortes and Quadra Islands, and beyond.

Click here for your FREE copy of Up the Inlet.



http://www.amazon.com/Across-Galactic-Sea-Wayne-Lutz-ebook/dp/B00AR6AOLCAcross the Galactic Sea

Description: Spaceship Challenger is on mankind’s first galactic voyage using a high-tech blend of space jumps and cryogenic hibernation. Captain Tina Brett leads her ship towards the ultimate goal, first contact with alien intelligence, until a navigational glitch changes everything. Then there's a mutiny, or is it something more? Six individuals on an epic journey for the good of mankind.

Click here for your FREE copy of Across the Galactic Sea


Happy reading from Wayne and Margy
www.PowellRiverBooks.com

Saturday, June 3, 2017

“The Queen of the North Disaster” by Colin Henthorne


I got The Queen of the North Disaster: The Captain’s Story (Harbour Publishing, 2016) by Colin Henthorne as a Christmas present for Wayne.

I knew we both would be interested in the captain’s first-hand account of the sinking of the BC Ferries Queen of the North off Gil Island in the Inside Passage of British Columbia’s northern coast.

Our hometown of Powell River is ferry dependent. If you want to come to or leave Powell River there are only two choices, by sea or air.

Flying on Pacific Coastal Airlines from Vancouver is quick, but relatively expensive. For the majority of people, BC Ferries is the logical choice for public transportation.

The other reason we were greatly interested in this book was because we were awakened around midnight on March 22, 2006, to heavy rain and destructive winds slamming our float cabin back and forth on her steel cable shore anchors. There was no way to get back to sleep, so we turned on the radio to listen to CBC. Rather than calming our nerves, we listened to the unfolding disaster happening to 101 passengers and crew far to the north.

Our bedside rechargeable CC Radio.
It was a terrible night for passengers and crew. Without warning, the side of the ferry was ripped open. Within 32 minutes, the crew searched and evacuated the entire ship. Even though it was a dangerous night, people with fishing boats from the First Nations community at Hartley Bay came to their assistance before the Coast Guard arrived. While it appeared everyone was evacuated, it was later determined that two passengers could not be found despite extensive land and sea searches.

The marine disaster resulted in commendations for the orderly evacuation, then lawsuits, court cases, sentences and firings. Colin Henthorne lost, then regained, only to lose again his position with BC Ferries. Crew on the bridge that night also had their lives disrupted by conjecture and innuendo, even prison time for one.

Captain Henthorne tells the story from his point of view including details about the Queen of the North as a ship, her workings, her crew and their responsibilities, and the events of that fateful night.

I recommend this book if you are interested in the history of naval accounts, if you use BC Ferries, or if you remember the incident and subsequent investigations. I learned a lot about the disaster and the ferry system that is a big part of my life. -- Margy